Blog, Garden, Monthly Gardening Chores

November Gardening Chores

It is November already and here in Holland it hardly feels like it as the temperature is high for the time of the year. I do not mind actually as I love watching the season changing slowly into deep autumn with beautiful clear blue skies with the odd spectacular cloud show.

Leaves are changing from bright yellow and red to browns, letting go when it’s their time to fall to the ground and become part of earths cycle! Always totally fascinating I find how life in nature goes it’s own sweet way and carries it’s own beauties with it.

Anyway here is the TO DO list for November…. with plenty of tasks to get stuck into… espescially raking leaves… apparently you burn heaps of calories whilst doing it… so go get out into the garden and get RAKING!!!

Early November is a good time to plant wallflowers, pansies and forget-me-nots for spring colour alongside tulip bulbs. There’s also still time to plant shrubs, perennials, roses and deciduous trees.
■ Bring tender plants, such as fuchsia, argyranthemums and geraniums, into a porch, greenhouse or conservatory before the first frost falls and causes them damage.
■ With high winds a possible danger at this time of year, check that an ties and stacks on climbers and trees are secure – though be sure they don’t cut into the stems. Also check that fences and other garden structures are secure.

■ Keep clearing up fallen autumn leaves from the lawn and flowerbeds.
■ and put them on the compost or bag up to make leaf mould. However, if the leaves are diseased – roses with blackspot, for example – they should be thrown away or burnt.
■ Spike the lawn with a fork or hollow tine aerator to stop the soil becoming compacted, and brush grit into the holes to improve drainage.
■ Wash out pots and seed trays then sort by size so you’re ready and organized for spring sowing.
■ Gather up leaves and store them for next year’s compost. Make holes in a plastic sack and fill with leaves, adding a little water if very dry. Tuck away out of sight until next autumn when the leaf mould will have broken down. Do not put in any leaves from the oak trees….
■ Fill gaps in flower borders. Plant wallflowers for bright shades and to
fill the garden with fragrance, as well as tulip bulbs for contrasting colour and height.
■ Tidy up your blackberry bushes. Branches that have borne fruit should be pruned to soil level. Tie new stems into place and encourage new roots by burying cane tips in the soil.
■ Start a compost trench for next year’s runner beans. Organic gardening charity, Garden Organic, recommends burying kitchen waste at a spade’s depth. Cover with soil every time you add to it to protect it from foxes.

■ Plant tulip bulbs.
■ Apply a thick mulch to your borders, especially over less hardy plants, such as agapanthus and kniphofia.
■ Plant garlic cloves if you’re in an area with a mild climate.
■ Dig over empty borders, particularly in the vegetable plot, so frost can help break down large clods of earth.
■ Bring some herbs into the kitchen to use over winter.
■ Plant winter bedding plants such as wallflowers, winter pansies and forget-me-nots.
■ Continue lifting, splitting and replanting overgrown clumps of herbaceous perennials.
■ Cut back pelargoniums and keep them in the greenhouse over winter ready for planting out next spring.
■ Plant roses.

Garden care

■ Bring forced bulbs inside once the buds are 5cm high. Stand the bowls in a cool place and turn by a quarter each day to ensure even growth.
■ Dig compost or manure into your kitchen garden or sow green manures such as field beans.
■ Protect clay pots from another hard winter by removing saucers and standing on feet or bricks
■ Clean greenhouses and cold-frame glass.

 ■ BUY special Olive protection bags  to shield and cover your potted Olive trees NOW…. When the weather changes all of a sudden you will already have them in the house!
 

Tidying

■ Tidy messy areas of the garden now that everything has died back and revealed where attention is needed.
■ Clean cold frame glass and greenhouse windows; light levels are low enough without added grime.
■ Collect and burn all the leaves from beneath your roses to control disease.
■ If the weather allows, hoe weeds before they take hold. 

Early November is a good time to plant wallflowers, pansies and forget-me-nots for spring colour alongside tulip bulbs. There’s also still time to plant shrubs, perennials, roses and deciduous trees.
■ Bring tender plants, such as fuchsia, argyranthemums and geraniums, into a porch, greenhouse or conservatory before the first frost falls and causes them damage.
■ With high winds a possible danger at this time of year, check that an ties and stacks on climbers and trees are secure – though be sure they don’t cut into the stems. Also check that fences and other garden structures are secure.

■ Keep clearing up fallen autumn leaves from the lawn and flowerbeds.
■ and put them on the compost or bag up to make leaf mould. However, if the leaves are diseased – roses with blackspot, for example – they should be thrown away or burnt.
■ Spike the lawn with a fork or hollow tine aerator to stop the soil becoming compacted, and brush grit into the holes to improve drainage.
■ Wash out pots and seed trays then sort by size so you’re ready and organized for spring sowing.
■ Gather up leaves and store them for next year’s compost. Make holes in a plastic sack and fill with leaves, adding a little water if very dry. Tuck away out of sight until next autumn when the leaf mould will have broken down. Do not put in any leaves from the oak trees….
■ Fill gaps in flower borders. Plant wallflowers for bright shades and to
fill the garden with fragrance, as well as tulip bulbs for contrasting colour and height.
■ Tidy up your blackberry bushes. Branches that have borne fruit should be pruned to soil level. Tie new stems into place and encourage new roots by burying cane tips in the soil.
■ Start a compost trench for next year’s runner beans. Organic gardening charity, Garden Organic, recommends burying kitchen waste at a spade’s depth. Cover with soil every time you add to it to protect it from foxes.

■ Plant tulip bulbs.
■ Apply a thick mulch to your borders, especially over less hardy plants, such as agapanthus and kniphofia.
■ Plant garlic cloves if you’re in an area with a mild climate.
■ Dig over empty borders, particularly in the vegetable plot, so frost can help break down large clods of earth.
■ Bring some herbs into the kitchen to use over winter.
■ Plant winter bedding plants such as wallflowers, winter pansies and forget-me-nots.
■ Continue lifting, splitting and replanting overgrown clumps of herbaceous perennials.
■ Cut back pelargoniums and keep them in the greenhouse over winter ready for planting out next spring.
■ Plant roses.

 

Garden care

■ Bring forced bulbs inside once the buds are 5cm high. Stand the bowls in a cool place and turn by a quarter each day to ensure even growth.
■ Dig compost or manure into your kitchen garden or sow green manures such as field beans.
■ Protect clay pots from another hard winter by removing saucers and standing on feet or bricks
■ Clean greenhouses and cold-frame glass.

 ■ BUY special Olive protection bags  to shield and cover your potted Olive trees NOW…. When the weather changes all of a sudden you will already have them in the house!
 

Tidying

■ Tidy messy areas of the garden now that everything has died back and revealed where attention is needed.
■ Clean cold frame glass and greenhouse windows; light levels are low enough without added grime.
■ Collect and burn all the leaves from beneath your roses to control disease.
■ If the weather allows, hoe weeds before they take hold.

Enjoy the last real month of pottering in your garden…. and then snuggle up inside and plant for the new born season to come!

Love, C

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